Electric vehicles charging
Electric vehicles being charged in San Diego. File photo

California has the green light to use federal infrastructure funds to help install over a million electric vehicle charging stations following federal approval of a joint plan by Caltrans and California Energy Commission.

The two agencies announced Monday that the initial $56 million was released following federal approval of California’s plans. The state expects to receive a total of $384 million over five years under the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law passed by Congress in 2021.

The state has already committed $10 billion to accelerate the transition to zero-emission vehicles by improving affordability and expanding charging infrastructure.

California plans install 1.2 million chargers along 6,600 miles of highways by 2030 to meet the anticipated charging needs of the state’s growing EV fleet.

“With this unprecedented federal investment, California can advance our vision of a unified network of charging stations along the state’s busiest corridors,” said California Energy Commission Commissioner Patty Monahan.

“This new network will increase charging access, particularly in the rural areas of our state, and help EV drivers charge up on long trips,” she said.

The state’s plan focuses on construction of fast-charging stations near interstates, U.S. highways and state routes throughout California.

California surpassed one million zero-emission vehicles sold in 2021 and plans to ban sales of gas-only vehicles in 2035. A dashboard on the state’s progress is available online.

Chris Jennewein

Chris Jennewein is Editor & Publisher of Times of San Diego.