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  1. […] The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries Times of San Diego For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with…  […]

  2. […] “For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with e-books. The advantages are obvious. With e-books, you no longer have to schlep to a library to take out a book. You just log on from whatever device connects you to the web, at whatever time and in whatever state of dress, and voila! the book appears on your screen. But the real attraction is price. Library budgets, along with university budgets, have been slashed, and such companies as Pearson and Elsevier offer e-book packages that make it possible to gain access (I’ll explain the awkward syntax in a moment) to lots of books at what seems like a minimal cost. The savings are multiplied when the package serves the entire system. So instead of each campus buying a paper book, all 23 CSU’s, for instance, share a single e-book. That’s the theory, at least. The reality is very different.” (via Times of San Diego) […]

  3. […] E-book prices seem entirely reasonable now, but once a library signs on, it must continually pay the rising subscription fee or the books will just vanish.  […]

  4. […] The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries. I hate this […]

  5. […] Times of San Diego The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries Times of San Diego For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace…  […]

  6. […] Ebooks a Poor Substitute for Print at Universities? (Times of San Diego) One observer thinks so. Among a handful of (much better) arguments the author cites for thinking twice about libraries’ efforts at boosting their ebook collections is the familiar canard about ebooks dulling reading comprehension. […]

  7. […] By Peter C. Herman"For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with e-books. The advantages are obvious. With e-books, you no longer have to schlep to a library to take out a book. You just log on from whatever device connects you to the web, at whatever time and in whatever state of dress, and voila! the book appears on your screen.But the real attraction is price. Library budgets, along with university budgets, have been slashed, and such companies as Pearson and Elsevier offer e-book packages that make it possible to gain access (I’ll explain the awkward syntax in a moment) to lots of books at what seems like a minimal cost. The savings are multiplied when the package serves the entire system. So instead of each campus buying a paper book, all 23 CSU’s, for instance, share a single e-book. That’s the theory, at least. The reality is very different." …"Instead, a library pays to access a data file by one of two routes: “PDA,” or “Patron-Driven Acquisition,” in which a vendor makes available a variety of e-books, and a certain number of “uses” (the definition varies) triggers a purchase, or a subscription to an e-library that does not involve any mechanism for buying the e-book. Both avenues come loaded with all sorts of problems.First, reading an e-book is a different, and lesser, experience that reading a paper book, just aswatching a movie at home differs from watching one in a theatre.There’s a huge difference between casual and college reading, and recent studies prove beyond doubt that while e-books are perfectly fine for the latest John Grisham or Fifty Shades of Grey, they actively discourage intense reading and deep learning."  […]

  8. […] The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries: For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with e-books. The advantages are obvious. With e-books, you no longer have to schlep to a library to take out a book. You just log on from whatever device connects you to the web, at whatever time and in whatever state of dress, and voila! the book appears on your screen (Times of San Diego) […]

  9. […] In this thoughtful essay, Peter C. Herman, a professor of English literature at San Diego State University, points out some of the positives and negatives of ebooks for academic libraries and their users. Read entire essay […]

  10. […] Do ebooks save university libraries money in the long term? […]

  11. […] 2. The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries (via The Times of San Diego) […]

  12. […] The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries  […]

  13. […] of English Literature at San Diego State University and he has a few things to say about The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries in this article that recently appeared in the Times of San […]

  14. […] “For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with e-books. The advantages are obvious. With e-books, you no longer have to schlep to a library to take out a book. You just log on from whatever device connects you to the web, at whatever time and in whatever state of dress, and voila! the book appears on your screen. But the real attraction is price. Library budgets, along with university budgets, have been slashed, and such companies as Pearson and Elsevier offer e-book packages that make it possible to gain access (I’ll explain the awkward syntax in a moment) to lots of books at what seems like a minimal cost. The savings are multiplied when the package serves the entire system. So instead of each campus buying a paper book, all 23 CSU’s, for instance, share a single e-book. That’s the theory, at least. The reality is very different.” (via Times of San Diego) […]

  15. […] The Hidden Costs of E-books at University Libraries (via nina de jesus)   […]

  16. […] This piece from The Times of San Diego has caused a significant ripple in the usually calm pond that is the SHARP listserv. Universities are starved for funds; university populations keep growing; cost cutting takes place in the library system; subscribing to an e-book package puts you on a treadmill leading apparently to Armageddon. Concern is escalating to existential panic about the university system as a whole: what about those evil MOOCs? […]

  17. […] "For the past few years, both the California State University and the University of California libraries have been experimenting with packages that replace paper books with e-books. The advantages are obvious. With e-books, you no longer have to schlep to a library to take out a book. You just log on from whatever device connects you to the web, at whatever time and in whatever state of dress, and voila! the book appears on your screen.'  […]

  18. […] in touch with the debate over academic freedom in China. California’s college libraries reappraised the “Faustian bargain” of loading up on e-books. The conversations continued about how to make a Ph.D. program equal parts […]