Charles Cox. Courtesy of scripps.ucsd.edu
Charles Cox. Courtesy of scripps.ucsd.edu

For the second time in about a week, the Scripps Institution of Oceanography announced the death Friday of a prominent retired scientist.

Professor Emeritus Charles Shipley “Chip” Cox died of cancer on Nov. 30 at his home in Del Mar, according to Scripps. He was 93.

Cox was a pioneer in researching the electromagnetic field in the ocean and the earth beneath the deep sea floor, and the structure of ocean temperature and salinity. For those purposes he developed high-resolution sensors, deployed them at sea and interpreted their records.

“Through the efforts of Chip Cox and his students, the two fields have since become established fields in science, industry and the military,” said Walter Munk, a world-renowned Scripps emeritus research professor of geophysics. Cox was Munk’s first student.

Cox, born Sept. 11, 1922, grew up in Hawaii. He earned a bachelor’s degree in physics from Caltech in 1944 and a Ph.D. in oceanography from Scripps in 1954.

He joined the research staff at Scripps that year and became a full professor of oceanography and research oceanography a dozen years later. He retired in 1991.

Cox is survived by Maryruth, his wife of 63 years, three daughters and a son. Another daughter died in 1987.

A celebration of his life and work will be held on Dec. 20, at the La Jolla home of Walter and Mary Munk. Donations to Scripps Oceanography are suggested in lieu of flowers.

Last week, the institution announced the Nov. 8 death of George Hemingway, a biological oceanographer who strengthened ties with research organizations in Mexico.

— City News Service